Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Prisoner deaths on the rise in Cherlapalli



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: PVCHR Communication <cfr.pvchr@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, Nov 4, 2014 at 7:46 PM
Subject: Prisoner deaths on the rise in Cherlapalli
To: covdnhrc <covdnhrc@nic.in>, jrlawnhrc <jrlawnhrc@hub.nic.in>
Cc: Lenin Raghuvanshi <pvchr.india@gmail.com>, Upendra <pvchr.adv@gmail.com>


To,
The Chairperson
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi

Dear Sir,

I want to bring in your kind attention towards the news published in Times of India on 4th November, 2014 regarding Prisoner deaths on the rise in Cherlapalli http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/City/Hyderabad/Prisoner-deaths-on-the-rise-in-Cherlapalli/articleshow/45028597.cms
Therefore it is a kind request please take appropriate action at earliest.
Thanking You
Sincerely Yours
Lenin Raghuvanshi
Secretary General
Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights

Prisoner deaths on the rise in Cherlapalli

TNN | Nov 4, 2014, 01.14 AM IST
HYDERABAD: Death of six prisoners due to health problems in a span of fortnight in Cherlapalli central prison speaks poorly of conditions. All of the prisoners were rushed to Gandhi hospital in an emergency situation, where they died later. 

It is learnt that nearly 200 inmates show up at the jail hospital everyday complaining of various ailments. They are given medication and admitted to hospital if the situation warrants. More serious cases are referred to Gandhi Hospital. However, more often than not, the ailing prisoners are rushed to Gandhi Hospital only when their condition becomes irretrievable. 

Two deaths were reported in the last 48 hours alone. An undertrial prisoner named Sanjay, 19, from Assam and a convict, B Vidya Sagar, 66, died at Gandhi Hospital after being shifted there in a critical condition. On October 25, a convict, Syed Chand , 54, from Karimnagar also succumbed at the hospital. 

Another death was reported on October 20. A 33-year-old convict, Nalla Danaiah, from Ranga Reddy district died at the same hospital due to extensive anterior wall myocardial infarction. On October 16, a convict, Shaik Mastan, 39, from Adilabad district, died of meningitis and acute kidney failure. Sources said the prison which has 1,900 inmates was practically ill-equipped to deal with medical cases until recently. There was only one doctor posted However, it was only a month ago that three more doctors were posted. 

Cherlapalli prison being a central correctional centre, prisoners from various districts are brought. With four doctors having been posted in the jail now, the situation is expected to improve. 

Meanwhile, it is learnt that the prison has taken up a health check-up. The jail also has an ECG machine. 

A prison official agreed that there had been an increase in deaths in the recent past. Though the prisons department had been asking the medical and health department to post some doctors, there was no response until a PIL was filed in the high court. 

It was only after the matter went to court, that three more doctors were posted.

Monday, September 29, 2014

A hope of inmates of Varanasi central jail





Link of complain: http://www.detentionwatch.blogspot.in/2014/08/re-releasing-of-inmates-who-spent-more.html



Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Strategy of PVCHR on detention watch










In April, 2011 PVCHR[i] in consultation with member organization of NATT[ii] officially launched detention watch to monitor any type of detention happening with the adult and children in Judicial Custody, Police Custody, Custody in Remand Home and Administrative Custody to strengthen and expansion of its previous work of PVCHR for focusing on rights of prisoners and rights during the times of detention.
The strategy of the detention watch based on 1.Policy to practice and 2. Practice to Policy. Article 21 of the Constitution guarantees the right of personal liberty and thereby prohibits any inhuman, cruel or degrading treatment to any person whether (s) he is a national or foreigner. Already many guidelines and direction from time to time were given by Hon’ble Supreme Court and High Court of various state courts for the well – being of prisoners and rights during detentions.[iii]
Our strategic actions are as follows:
  1. Court Intervention: Public Interest Litigation (PIL)[iv] and writ petition
  2. Meta- Legal Intervention: With various concerned authorities and National Human Rights Commission, New Delhi.
  3. Rehabilitation of the acquitted prisoners.
  4. Policy level intervention for prison reform, advocating for the implementation of various recommendations by the committee and intervention on the trial procedures.
  5. Monitoring the prison and homes through using of Right to Information Act – to know actual knowledge condition of the prisons.
  6. Visit to juvenile home and visit to correction home for women in collaboration with QIC-AC network.
  7. Tracking the cases of custodial death, torture in police custody, administrative custody and homes through various site alerts.




[i] Peoples’ Vigilance Committee on Human Rights


[ii] National Alliance on Testimonial Therapy


[iii] The existing statutes which have a bearing on regulation and management of prisons in the country are:

(i) The Indian Penal Code, 1860. (ii) The Prisons Act, 1894. (iii) The Prisoners Act, 1900. (iv) The Identification of Prisoners Act, 1920. (v) Constitution of India, 1950 (vi) The Transfer of Prisoners Act, 1950. (vii) The Representation of People‟s Act, 1951. (viii) The Prisoners (Attendance in Courts) Act, 1955.

(ix) The Probation of Offenders Act, 1958. (x) The Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973. (xi) The Mental Health Act, 1987. (xii) The Juvenile Justice (Care & Protection) Act, 2000. (xiii) The Repatriation of Prisoners Act, 2003. (xiv) Model Prison Manual (2003).

3. Various Committees, Commissions and Groups have been constituted by the State Governments as well as the Government of India (GoI), from time to time, such as the All India Prison Reforms Committee (1980) under the Chairmanship of Justice A.N. Mulla (Retd.), R.K. Kapoor Committee (1986) and Justice Krishna Iyer Committee (1987) to study and make suggestions for improving the prison conditions and administration, inter alia, with a view to making them more conducive to the reformation and rehabilitation of prisoners. These committees made a number of recommendations to improve the conditions of prisons, prisoners and prison personnel all over the country. In its judgments on various aspects of prison administration, the Supreme Court of India has laid down three broad principles regarding imprisonment and custody. Firstly, a person in prison does not become a non-person; secondly, a person in prison is entitled to all human rights within the limitations of imprisonment; and, lastly there is no justification for aggravating the suffering already inherent in the process of incarceration (From NIMHANS prison strategy)







 

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Urgent petition on english news portal "F.India/PTI'' on 01 September 2014, Amritsar edition regarding “Police torture over petty theft leads Punjab teen to commit suicide" on Amritsar (Punjab)

Detention Watch <pvchr.adv@gmail.com>                                     

Sep 3 (1 day ago)



To,
The Chairperson                                                                                           
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi.

Dear Sir, 

I want to bring your kind attention towards the news link of daily english news portal  "F.India/PTI'' on 01 September 2014, Amritsar edition regarding Police torture over petty theft leads Punjab teen to commit suicide"(news clipping link & details annexed). 

http://www.firstpost.com/india/police-torture-petty-theft-leads-punjab-teen-commit-suicide-1691379.html



Sep 1, 2014 14:47 IST

Amritsar: A teenager committed suicide here after being allegedly tortured by a cop for his "involvement" in a theft case.
Representational image. Agencies
Representational image. Agencies
Harjit Singh (15) committed suicide last night in Sultanwind village on the outskirts of the city, police said on Monday.
However, parents of the boy alleged that Harjit was whisked away by police for his alleged involvement in a theft case.
During two days of illegal confinement, he was allegedly inflicted inhuman torture, they alleged.
The moment he was let off by the police, he went to the fields in Sultanwind where he allegedly hanged himself from a tree and died on the spot, his parents alleged.
Police had tortured the boy for allegedly stealing a water pipe that was lying abandoned on roadside.
The parents of deceased demanded strict action besides registration of criminal case against police officials who were responsible for inflicting torture that led him to take extreme step of suicide.
The boy was allegedly tortured by a cop Iqbal Singh posted in the Tarn Taran police who detained him and tortured him mercilessly, the deceased's parents alleged.
Tarn Taran SSP Manmohan Sharma said that Assistant Sub Inspector (ASI) Iqbal Singh has been placed under suspension.
However, the autopsy of the boy will be conducted by the medical board to check the injury marks, Sharma said.
PTI


Therefore it is kind request please take appropriate action at earliest.



Thanking You,

Sincerely Yours,

Lenin Raghuvanshi
Founder & CEO
Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights
SA 4/2 A Daulatpur, Varanasi – 221002 (U.P)
Mobile No: +91- 9935599333


Urgent petition on "Lack of food behind half of TB cases- Holes in control bid''

Detention Watch <pvchr.adv@gmail.com>                             

Aug 30 (5 days ago)


 
To,
The Chairperson,                                      
National  Human Rights Commission,
New Delhi.

Dear Sir,

I want to bring your kind attention towards the news paper link of English daily news paper "The Telegraph'' on August 30 , 2014,  edition regarding "Lack of food behind half of TB cases- Holes in control bid'' (news clipping file annexed).

Lack of food behind half of TB cases- Holes in control bid

G.S. MUDUR
New Delhi, Aug. 29: Poor nutrition is the biggest contributor to India’s burden of tuberculosis and explains why the number of new patients each year has remained nearly static despite two decades of TB control efforts, a research study has suggested.
The study has found that the infections in about 55 per cent of patients — including 67 per cent in girls between 15 and 19 years and 62 per cent in adolescent boys — appear linked to under-nutrition.
Health researchers at the Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences (HIMS), Dehradun, and McGill University in Montreal, Canada, who conducted the study say their findings highlight a key factor that activates TB infection but has been largely ignored by health authorities.
“Our TB control efforts have focused almost exclusively on biomedical aspects — a vaccine given during infancy, diagnosis and drug-therapy,” said Anurag Bhargava, a senior medicine consultant at the HIMS and the study’s lead author.
The findings were published today in The National Medical Journal of India.
The vaccine does not provide long-term protection. India’s incidence of TB — new cases per year — has remained fairly static at about 175 per 100,000 population over the past decade. India’s public health system had documented over 1.2 million cases in 2012.
The bacilli that cause TB may remain dormant and silent in the body for years without causing any symptoms until factors such as poor nutrition, smoking or diabetes suppress the immunity and cause active disease.
Health experts estimate that nearly 400 million people in India are already infected but have no symptoms because their immune systems are keeping the TB bacilli in check. But impaired immunity puts them at risk of developing active disease.
“With the focus on diagnosis and drugs, the importance of nutrition has been ignored,” said Soumya Swaminathan, director of the National Institute For Research in Tuberculosis, Chennai, who was not associated with the study.
But while the TB control programme is responsible for diagnosis and treatment, Swaminathan and other experts say, ensuring adequate nutrition for the population could be seen as a task that would involve other non-health arms of the government.
The study by Bhargava and his colleagues used national data on under-nutrition to derive estimates for the proportion of TB cases that could be explained through this factor. “This (55 per cent) is a big fraction,” said Madhukar Pai, an epidemiologist at McGill University and co-author of the study. “It suggests that unless we tackle malnutrition, it may be difficult to control TB,” Pai said.
An earlier study published four years ago by health officials who manage the country’s TB programme had estimated that under-nutrition contributes to only about 31 per cent of the cases, while the proportion linked to HIV infections — that also lead to suppressed immunity — was estimated to be 11 per cent.
It has been estimated that smoking accounted for 9 per cent and diabetes for 5 per cent of active TB infections.
However, the analysis by the HIMS-McGill team found that in three eastern states — Bihar, Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand — the fractions of TB cases associated with poor nutrition were above 60 per cent.
“For all the hype about economic growth, the epidemic proportions of poor nutrition and TB suggests that India has a long way to go to address inequity and improving the health of the poor,” Pai said.

Therefore it is kind request please take appropriate action at earliest.

Thanking You,

Sincerely Yours,

Dr. Lenin Raghuvanshi
Founder & CEO
Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights/Jan Mitra Nyas
An Initiative of JMN
SA 4/2 A Daulatpur, Varanasi
Mobile No: +91-9935599333
-----------------------------------------
Please Visit :-

Urgent appeal on “School toilets lack water supply, proper hygiene” & “2,355 school in Uttar Pradesh lack girls’ toilets” in Varanasi (U.P)

Detention Watch <pvchr.adv@gmail.com>

AttachmentsAug 26 (9 days ago)


to covdnhrc, Lenin, Lenin, bcc: akpnhrc, bcc: jrlawnhrc, bcc: Anil, bcc: Shirin, bcc: anup, bcc: Shruti, bcc: jmn.pvchr
To,                                                                           26 Aug 2014
The Chairperson                                                                                            
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi.

Dear Sir,

I want to bring in your kind attention towards the daily news published in the local English newspaper The Times of India and Hindustan Times dated on 19 & 22 August 2014 Varanasi edition regarding  “School toilets lack water supply, proper hygiene” &  “2,355 school in Uttar Pradesh lack girls’ toilets”  in Varanasi district. (Newspaper clipping annexed).


Therefore it is kind request please take appropriate action against related department.


Thanking You,

Sincerely Yours,

Lenin Raghuvanshi
Founder & CEO
Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights
SA 4/2 A Daulatpur, Varanasi – 221002 (U.P)
Mobile No: +91- 9935599333


Urgent petition on “India's prisons overcrowded, Chhattisgarh jails have 252 % occupancy”

Detention Watch <pvchr.adv@gmail.com>

Aug 26 (9 days ago)


to covdnhrc, Lenin, Lenin, bcc: jrlawnhrc, bcc: akpnhrc, bcc: Shirin, bcc: anup
To,                                                       26//08/2014                                                    
The Chairperson                                                                                           
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi.

Dear Sir, 

I want to bring in your kind attention towards the daily news published in the local English newspaper The Times of India “India's prisons overcrowded, Chhattisgarh jails have 252 % occupancy”. (Newspaper clipping annexed). 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Indias-prisons-overcrowded-Chhattisgarh-jails-have-252-occupancy/articleshow/24883153.cms

Ch Sushil Rao, TNN | Oct 29, 2013, 06.54PM IST
HYDERABAD: Indian jails are over-crowded. While the available capacity is 3, 43,169, the total inmate population is much higher at 3, 85,135. That would make the occupancy rate 112.2 per cent.

While there is not a single prisoner in the Union territory of Lakshadweep island prison which has an inmate capacity of 16, the situation was reverse in Chhattisgarh sate, according to prison statistics available with the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).

In Chhattisgarh state, while the available capacity of the prisons is 5,850, there is a total of 14,780 prisoners stuff in the jails. This only means the occupancy rate is as high as 252.6 per cent. There are also other states where the jails were overcrowded in the year 2012, going by the figures with the NCRB.

Though the capacity of jails in Delhi is 6,250, the total number of prisoners in them was 12,113, which is 193.8 per cent occupancy. In Uttar Pradesh jails, there were 80,311 prisoners in accommodation meant for only 47,518 prisoners. The occupancy was 169 per cent. In Punjab, 23,219 prisoners occupied space meant for only 17,410 and the occupancy rate is calculated at 133.4 per cent.

Several other prisons too were overcrowded. These included Meghalaya (131.3%), Madhya Pradesh (127.7%), Arunachal Pradesh (126.8%), Jharkhand (124.5 %), Goa (119.5%), Rajasthan (116.6%), Sikkim (114 %), Himachal Pradesh (105.5%), Kerala (104.4%), Assam (103.7%), Andaman and Nicobar Islands (101.5 per cent), West Bengal (100.7%) and Karnataka (100.3%).

Women prisoners too had to adjust with the overcrowding problem in Uttarakhand (153.6%), Chhattisgarh (150.3%), Delhi (135%), Goa (112%), Jharkhand (106.9%) and Uttar Pradesh (102.8%).

Though the NCRB did not specify the reasons for overcrowding of prisons, the reasons could be several. It is learnt that many languish in prisons without getting bail in the court. There are also many instances where though the court does grant bail, the prisoner finds it difficult to get sureties on his behalf. Since the sureties would be responsible if the accused jumps bail, they back out of standing surety for their friends or even family members. There can also be cases where the court will let off the prisoner with a fine but the accused may not even have the money to pay it and come out of jail.

Overcrowding in prisons leads to infectious diseases spreading in the jail. It is the responsibility of the government to provide space as per international norms for prisoners.  

Therefore it is kind request please take appropriate action against related department.


Thanking You,

Sincerely Yours,

Dr. Lenin Raghuvanshi
Founder & CEO
Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights
SA 4/2 A Daulatpur, Varanasi – 221002 (U.P)
Mobile No: +91- 9935599333

Urgent petition on “Bangalore: Remand home staff thrash 13-year-old boy”

Detention Watch <pvchr.adv@gmail.com>

Aug 23 (12 days ago)


to ncpcr.india, Lenin, Lenin, Shruti, bcc: Shirin, bcc: anup, bcc: jmn.pvchr
To,                                                                              23/08/2014 
The Chairperson                                                                
National Commission for Protection of Child Rights
New Delhi

Dear Sir,

I want to bring in your kind attention towards the daily news published in English & Hindi newspaper/magazine India today “Bangalore: Remand home staff thrash 13-year-old boy”  in Bangalore district Karnataka . (Newspaper clipping & link annexed). The detail story attached with the complaint letter.

Bangalore: Remand home staff thrash 13-year-old boy

Mail Today   |   Mail Today  |   Bangalore, August 23, 2014 | UPDATED 16:30 IST
 
In a shocking  incident, a 13-year-old boy was thrashed black and blue by the staff of a Government Boys' Remand Home in Bangalore after he refused to clean toilets.
The boy is now undergoing treatment at a government hospital while the three accused, including the head of the remand home, are absconding.
It all started on Tuesday (August 19) when the victim decided to venture out with his friends after school hours. Instead of going home, the boy went to Magadi Road where he was spotted by local policemen. Mistaking him for a run-away kid, the police took him to BOSCO Mane (NGO centre for run-away kids). The same evening, the boy was transferred to the government boys' home at Lakkasandra despite his protests. The boy wanted the staff to con-tact his mother over the phone, but they reportedly turned down his request.
Apparently, the boy's father had abandoned the family and his mother had lost her job as a security guard recently. Last week, the boy was irregular in school and the management had summoned his mother, who explained the family's plight. After the victim did not come home, his mother frantically searched for him but in vain.
The boy was admitted to the remand home around 7 pm on Tuesday and the staff decided to teach him a "lesson". He was first caned as "punishment" for almost about 10 minutes.
The next day, the boy was asked to clean the drains and the toilets of the home, but when he refused, the warden and his associates made him kneel on the ground and thrashed him .
However, on Wednesday when the government-appointed Child Welfare Committee mem-bers visited the Home for inspection, they were horrified on seeing the boy's condition. They admitted the boy to the hospi-tal and contacted his mother
The victim has named the remand home head Ramesh Manju and staff Santosh and Narasimha responsible for the injuries. A police complaint has been lodged.
For more news from India Today, follow us on Twitter @indiatoday and on Facebook at facebook.com/IndiaToday


Therefore it is kind request please take appropriate action against related department.


Thanking You,



Sincerely Yours,


Shruti Nagvanshi
Managing Trusty
Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights
SA 4/2 A Daulatpur, Varanasi – 221002 (U.P)
Mobile No: +91- 9935599330
Email Id: shruti@pvchr.asia

Urgent appeal on "Plea to BMC to evict centre for mentally challenged"

Detention Watch <pvchr.adv@gmail.com>



to covdnhrc, jrlawnhrc, Anil, akpnhrc, Lenin, Lenin, bcc: Shirin, bcc: anup                             Aug 12,2014


To,
The Chairperson
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi

Dear Sir,

I want to bring in your kind attention towards the news published in the local english newspaper "The Times of India" regarding "Plea to BMC to evict centre for mentally challenged"(Newspaper clipping annexed).
 

Plea to BMC to evict centre for mentally challenged

MUMBAI: Residents of a housing society in Bandra say they are facing multiple problems due to a workshop for mentally challenged adults that is being run on the ground floor. The managing committee of Ben Mar building near Mehboob Studio has written to the BMC to evict the Happy Hours centre whose lease, according to the residents, has expired.

The workshop provides vocational training to mentally disabled people. Some are afflicted with cerebral palsy, others are "retarded and deaf". All are adults aged 18-60.

The society has barred entry through the front entrance and is urging the school to use the rear gate which gives direct access to the centre. "The students' cars speed through the front gate and we are afraid for our senior citizens and children. They also use our parking space. Recently, a 30-year-old female inmate smashed the windscreen of a brand new car with a stone. Another threatened to beat up my neighbour's kids. We are sympathetic to mentally challenged people because they do not know what they are doing, but for how long must we live in fear in our own homes?" says Sushila Fletcher, secretary of the society.
Ground floor residents complain of inmates peeping into their bathrooms. "Even the caretakers who drop them here can't control them. They throw temper tantrums, scream and shout. Our children are scared of going out to play until the workshop closes,"says another.

Moreover, two houses were burgled in broad daylight, including that of Father Nigel Barrett, a senior official of the Catholic Church. "Father Nigel's old father lives alone, he could have come to harm. Unknown people, including bikers, claim they are visiting the centre, only to use our gates as a shortcut to the next lane. How can we risk opening both gates all day?" says Fletcher.

The NGO says disabled people are being victimized. Spokeswoman Manjusha Singh says, "We are running the centre smoothly since decades. The inmates are not responsible for the robberies, and the building has a watchman and CCTVs for security. The one time our student damaged a resident's car, her father paid full compensation." But the car owner denies "being paid a penny".

Singh alleged that residents dump garbage near the centre.

Fr Nigel says the solution is for the centre to utilize the rear gate, which is barely 3m away. "We had no problems with the inmates during my growing years. But then most residents were young couples, now they are senior citizens," he says.


Therefore it is kind request
 

Thanking You,

Sincerely Yours,

Lenin Raghuvanshi
Secretary General
Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights
Sa 4/2 A Daulatpur, Varanasi - 221002Mobile No: +91-9935599333

Friday, August 29, 2014

regarding direction for the implementation of Landmark decision given by Hon'ble Bombay High Court in all police stations of India

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Pvchr <cfr.pvchr@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, Aug 26, 2014 at 10:52 AM
Subject: regarding direction for the implementation of Landmark decision given by Hon'ble Bombay High Court in all police stations of India.
To: covdnhrc@nic.in, jrlawnhrc@hub.nic.in
Cc: Lenin Raghuvanshi <pvchr.india@gmail.com>


To,
The Chairperson
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi

Sub: regarding direction for the implementation of Landmark decision given by Hon'ble Bombay High Court in all police stations of India.

Dear Sir,

I want to bring in your kind attention towards the landmark decision of Hon'ble  High Court of Bombay for installation of CC TV in all police station of Maharastra http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/HC-orders-CCTV-cams-at-police-stations/articleshow/40206039.cms

HC orders CCTV cams at police stations
Shibu Thomas | Aug 13, 2014, 11.43PM IST

MUMBAI: Observing that the rising number of custodial deaths in Maharashtra was "alarming", the Bombay high court has directed the state government to install CCTV cameras at police stations and ensure that FIRs are registered if accused die in custody. The cameras are to be installed in such a way that areas like corridors and lock-ups at a police station are covered 24x7.

"The number of custodial deaths in Maharashtra is alarming. Unfortunately, we do not know why the higher echelons of the police force are oblivious to the problem of custodial torture and death. May be they want to protect their officers," said a division bench of Justices V M Kanade and P D Kode on Wednesday. As per the bench, the "responsibility of the safety, health and wellbeing of a person who is arrested will be that of the officer who arrested him, the investigation officer and the station-in-charge".

The court said CCTV data would be preserved for a year and the senior inspector of a police station would be responsible for ensuring that the cameras are operational. In Mumbai alone, there are 93 police stations. Legal experts believe that the installation of CCTV cameras will ensure that the police are more careful about illegally detaining an accused or torturing him to force a confession. The direction to register an FIR assumes significance as in most cases the state orders a magisterial inquiry, but no case is registered unless the court intervenes.


Advocate Yug Chaudhry, who was appointed as amicus curiae (friend of the court), pointed to data by the National Crime Records Bureau, which revealed that between 1999 and 2013, there were 333 custodial deaths in Maharashtra—over 23% of all custodial deaths in India occurred in the state. There were 45 FIRs; only 19 charge-sheets were filed and nobody was convicted. Chaudhry said that despite the Supreme Court's orders about norms to be followed while arresting a person, the police were in violation.

The high court's guidelines include the taking of photographs if an accused is injured in custody and taking him to the nearest hospital, monitoring of investigations by a magistrate and making efforts to arrest the officers involved.

The court has directed the state to file a compliance report within four weeks. It was hearing petitions filed by families of persons who had died in custody, including the April 2014 deaths of Agnello Valdaris in the Wadala railway police station and Akash Kharade in the Samata Nagar police lock-up.

Therefore sir, it is a kind request to direct for implementation of this landmark decision not only in Maharastra but in all police station of India to prevent the custodial death and torture in police station with implementation of Hon' ble  D.K Basu guideline.


Thanking you
Sincerely yours

Lenin Raghuvanshi
Secretary General
PVCHR

BANARAS CONVENTION {PART - 2}

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Re: releasing of inmates who spent more than 14 years in Varanasi central prison




---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: PVCHR Communication <cfr.pvchr@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, Aug 16, 2014 at 3:29 PM
Subject: Sub: Re: releasing of inmates who spent more than 14 years in Varanasi central prison
To: covdnhrc <covdnhrc@nic.in>, jrlawnhrc <jrlawnhrc@hub.nic.in>
Cc: "Dr. Lenin Raghuvanshi" <lenin@pvchr.asia>



16th August, 2014
 

To,

The Chairperson

National Human Rights Commission

New Delhi

 

Sub: Re: releasing of inmates who spent more than 14 years in Varanasi central prison


Dear Sir,


I want to bring in your kind attention towards the list of the 213 life imprisonment inmates who spent 14 years in Varanasi central prison (situation according to the 01.07.2014). List of the inmates annexed.


It is a kind request to give direction for release of these inmates on the reference of the judgment given by Hon’ble Allahabad high court PIL Writ No.2357/1997 Bachche Lal Vs State of UP & Others passing the order, Justice Amar Saran and Justice SC Nigam observed that there were more than 500 such prisoners in the state, who had been sentenced for life and had spent more than 14 years behind the bars. The court ordered that authorities, who have been empowered to look into the matter of premature release of prisoners, shall "proceed without waiting for the report from the concerned jail if sufficient matter for taking such action is available" and article 161 of Indian Constitution. http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-hc-directive-on-release-of-those-in-jail-for-more-than-14-years-1346572

 

We request to provide appropriate instruction for release of these prisoner in context of judgment of honourable High Court and article 161 of constitution. 


Thanking You

Sincerely Yours

 

(Lenin Raghuvanshi)

Secretary General